Google Organizational Structure Essays On Education

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  • Organizational Culture of Google Essay

    624 Words3 Pages

    Organizational culture is the essence of any company. It is the way a company separates themselves from the market and especially, from their competition. According to an article in Business Insider, “Corporate culture is the personality of a company and it can’t be faked” (Schawbel, 2013, Cultural research section, para. 1). For the purpose of this paper, I will be investigating the corporate culture of Google Incorporated. Google was founded in 1998 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin who met at Stanford University in 1995 (Google Company website).
    What is Google’s organizational culture? Google’s organizational culture is represented in several ways which include their management structure, and their public transparency, their…show more content…

    Organizational culture is the essence of any company. It is the way a company separates themselves from the market and especially, from their competition. According to an article in Business Insider, “Corporate culture is the personality of a company and it can’t be faked” (Schawbel, 2013, Cultural research section, para. 1). For the purpose of this paper, I will be investigating the corporate culture of Google Incorporated. Google was founded in 1998 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin who met at Stanford University in 1995 (Google Company website).
    What is Google’s organizational culture? Google’s organizational culture is represented in several ways which include their management structure, and their public transparency, their treatment of employees, etc. Below is an excerpt from an article in Business Insider:
    Employees are offered free cafeteria food and there’s a flat management structure. They have also made their company’s core values public. The company founders still do busy work, including keeping the cereal fresh in the cafeteria. Google is constantly getting feedback from employees and even has their own tool called Google-O-Meter to gauge the popularity of employee suggestions. In addition, they have “culture clubs”, which are groups of employees who come together to talk about culture issues within their country or office and how to improve things. Google is a special place to work because the way they design their office spaces and groups is that you

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